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Carnivorous Plants - Drosera adelae
by Makoto Honda
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PHOTO: 
Drosera adelae

2007-December-28. 
I got this sundew from a local flower shop a couple of months ago. 
This Australian sundew is easy to grow and propagate.
It is growing well in our  kitchen, producing deep-red flowers now.

PHOTO:  Drosera adelae

The inflorescence is a raceme, with each flower attached to the main stalk (peduncle) by a short pedicel.
Flowering starts from the lowest flower onwards. 
A new flower opens every day, with each flower lasting for several days.
Several open flowers are seen on a given peduncle during flowering.

PHOTO:  Drosera adelae

In conformity with the general floral scheme of sundews (genus Drosera),
there are five sepals, five petals, five stamens, and three styles each branching out to two arms.

PHOTO:  Drosera adelae

A new leaf is covered with fine hairs...

PHOTO:  Drosera adelae

Although exposed to the sufficient sunlight though the window, the light intensity appears not strong enough to make the leaves turn to deep-maroon coloration.
Bright red tentacle tips contrast well against the light green leaf surface.
 

PHOTO:  Drosera adelae

Crystal-clear dew-drops provide a visual lure for unsuspecting insects.

PHOTO:  Drosera adelae

A long stalk of the tentacle assumes a reddish tint.

PHOTO:  Drosera adelae

Photo Data: 
The flower photos taken by Nikon D200 with Nikkor 55mm F2.8 macro lens (with an extension tube) at F8
using natural light coming from the kitchen window.  A small reflector was used to fill the shadow. 
The tentacle shots were made by D200 with Olympus Zuiko Macro 20mm F3.5 lens at F8 using D200's on-camera flash. 
I often use a sheet of 8.5 x 11 white paper attached to the top of the flash cover to reflect the flash light to the close-up subject that is only half an inch away from the lens.

 

Carnivorous Plants Photography Web Site:  Copyright 2001-2017 Makoto Honda. All Rights Reserved.  
   

Copyright 2001-2017 Makoto Honda. All Rights Reserved.                                       www.iCarnivorousPlants.com                                       since June 2001